Advertising  |  About Us  |  Contact Us  |  RSS

Filmmaker Forums

Our message boards to connect with other filmmakers from around the world.

Profile | Register | Active Topics | Members | Search | FAQ
Username:
 
Password:
Save Password
Forgot your Password?

 All Forums
 General Discussion Groups
 Noob Questions
 Filming in the rain
 New Topic  Reply to Topic
 Printer Friendly

Author Previous Topic Topic Next Topic  

Nonrebelliousteen
Junior Member

22 Posts

Posted - 19 Jan 2010 :  09:36:49  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Okay, if my last question didn't sound rookie, this one will.

I'm going to be filming this week, but the forecast says that there's a 50% chance of rain.....what do I do? My camcorder is pretty small, and I don't think that it would respond so well if it got rained on.

Is there any practical advice anyone can give in this matter? Maybe a DIY solution? I can't reschedule this, so that's not an option.

rjschwarz
Advanced Member

USA
1845 Posts

Posted - 19 Jan 2010 :  10:10:35  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Even if you use umbrellas you are likely to get rain sounds over the audio.

I don't know of a solution.

RJSchwarz
Go to Top of Page

Nonrebelliousteen
Junior Member

22 Posts

Posted - 19 Jan 2010 :  10:15:57  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks Schwarz. I'm not too concerned about the audio, it would be nice, but I'm going to have music playing over this part anyways.

I've considered using an umbrella, but I was just wondering if there was anything else that I had missed.
Go to Top of Page

certified instigator
Moderator

USA
3099 Posts

Posted - 19 Jan 2010 :  11:37:29  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
You know those rain slickers available? You could could put
one of those over the camera. Your camera is small, what
about a food storage bag to cover it? How about a bit of
plastic wrap?

But it sure seems to me that the best DIY option is to open
up an umbrella.

=============================================
The aim of an argument or discussion should not be victory, but progress.
Joseph Joubert, essayist (1754-1824)
Go to Top of Page

Nonrebelliousteen
Junior Member

22 Posts

Posted - 19 Jan 2010 :  12:26:27  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Dang, I knew that sounded rookie... Yea, I'll probably use the umbrella and some sort of plastic. I'll post the link to the film in the promo section once it's finished.

Thanks!
Go to Top of Page

bjdzyak
Senior Member

USA
592 Posts

Posted - 20 Jan 2010 :  02:26:31  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
If the camera has to move a lot, the best way to protect it AND keep is usable is to take a clear garbage bag and put the camera inside of it with the open end of the bag ending up at the back-end of the camera.

Push the front end (the closed side) against the lens. Tear a small hole and carefully stretch the plastic around the lens. Use a wide rubberband to secure the plastic in place around the lens. Now, you'll keep the rain from hitting the camera body while still being able to see and use the controls.

Keep Dust Off handy to blow the lens clean. IF the shot you're shooting means that the lens will consistently get hit, if sound isn't an issue, you can use Dust Off blowing across the lens out of shot to keep rain drops from hitting the glass.

If the camera doesn't have to move, you could put up an Easy-Up to protect the camera and the Camera Operator during the shot. Or, use a C-stand with a large Flag to form a kind of ceiling to cover camera and Operator.

Brian Dzyak
Cameraman/Author
IATSE Local 600, SOC
http://www.whatireallywanttodo.com
http://www.realfilmcareer.com
Go to Top of Page

Nonrebelliousteen
Junior Member

22 Posts

Posted - 24 Jan 2010 :  18:13:33  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hey! Thanks for all the advice! I was filming the March For Life in DC this weekend, and there was an 80% chance of sleet and snow...but as it turned out, there was a blue sky! Pretty amazing!
Go to Top of Page
  Previous Topic Topic Next Topic  
 New Topic  Reply to Topic
 Printer Friendly
Jump To:
Snitz Forums 2000