5 Tips for a Successful Film Reel

By , posted 12 April 2010

A film reel can be the stepping stone to a rewarding career in the film or television industry. This can make or break your career. There are many opportunities for filmmakers, directors, cinematographers and editors to make a lasting impression and land the perfect job. Have you ever wondered what makes a good film reel?

A successful film reel showcases your personality through your finest accomplishments. Here are some important things to keep in mind while putting together your film reel:

  1. Make sure you open the reel with a clip that will grab the attention of the agent in charge of hiring. Oftentimes, agents or hiring professionals will only view the first few seconds of a reel and turn it off it they’re not impressed. Give them something exciting to watch in that initial few seconds.
  2. Show them a variety of work. Don’t just show them comedy. Show the viewers drama, horror and action. This shows that you are adaptable in a variety of genres. Remember that versatility can lead to job opportunities.
  3. Make your reel short and to the point. A hiring agent does not want to watch a short film. He/she wants to gauge your experience level, and determine what elements you have worked with in the past.
  4. The total running time of your reel should be no longer than 3 to 4 minutes. If the agent or hiring professional wants to see more of your work, they will contact you and request you send additional footage.
  5. Ensure your name and contact information is visible onscreen at the beginning and at the end of your reel. You want to get your name out there. Make it convenient for the hiring agent to write down your contact information.
Now you can get started on creating a solid film reel that showcases your best work. Don't forget, it's all about the first impression.

This article is presented by Collins College. Contact us today if you're interested in developing marketable knowledge and career-relevant skills with an industry-current degree program from Collins College.

Collins College does not guarantee employment or salary.

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