5 Movies that Will Change Your Perception of Movie Making

By Erik Winther, posted 25 November 2016

The film industry is filled with inspirational moments that changed millions of mindsets throughout our planet. However, today we'll focus on the main 5 movies that succeeded to alter the methods of shooting movies. Let's see which these are and where lies the source of their power to turn things around.

1. 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968)


Image Credit: MGM

Stanley Kubrick made history with his 1968 masterpiece, "2001: A Space Odyssey". You can either love this movie or hate it, there's no room for in between. What is special about this film is that dialogues cover only 40 minutes. The rest of over one hour and a half were dedicated to beauty. Many film goers are questioning the decision to film a spaceships docking for 15 minutes. But Stanley Kubrick played all his creative cards on precisely this kind of magnificent sceneries that are amplified by a deafening silence.

The outer space plays by different rules that the usual movie making couldn't have ever grasped. The movie evolves at the same pace os how objects are moving in a zero gravity environment. Two astronauts and a talking computer called Hal round up the list of main characters. And for Stanley Kubrick, there are enough characters to avoid cluttering the two main focuses of the movie: the visuals and the special effects.

Ridley Scott saw a dreadful aftermath of this masterpiece: "After '2001: A Space Odyssey,' science fiction is dead." And he was right. The following movies have not succeeded yet to bring something new to this genre. And there have already passed 48 years since its opening night.

2. Birdman (2014)


Image Credit: New Regency Pictures

When you have a filming crew of maximum ten persons and a budget of $1, it is still hard to make a one shot movie. Now imagine how difficult it would be to manage a $18,000,000 budget and tens of actors in one shot movie. The Director Alejandro González Iñárritu' actually achieved this impossible mission in 2014. Even though he resorted to many illusions, he succeeded to keep the takes at a minimum number. What's more is that he created an Oscar-winning movie in just two months. Not to mention that this extremely limited time included rehearsals also.

Once you finish watching ‘Birdman,' your perception will suffer a session of complete awe, and that's all thanks to a smart cinematic magic trick. The master of illusions Alejandro has also instructed his crew not to reveal the length of each take. Thus, his masterpiece will go down in history for good.

3. Avatar (2009)


Image Credit: Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation

Our list wouldn't have been right if we didn't mention the "Avatar" movie that completely changed the direction of the entertainment industry. The secret to really enjoy this movie is to forget about dialogue, plot, characters. Instead, you just have to relax and immerse yourself in a three-dimensional experience.

James Cameron was the first director who understood how the future of cinema would look like. So, he gambled everything on the wonderful world that only the latest CGI technology could have created. And he was so right to do so. It took him four years to realize his vision, and it was all worth it.

"Avatar" is the first movie which has ever reached the $2.5 million in the history of cinema even if we consider the inflation. What is really remarkable about this creation is that it brought value to the 3D technology. It is no longer a whim to film a movie in 3D, but it requires skill and a drop of genius. You have to use this technology in such a way, that the audience gets pumped with adrenaline for the entire screening time.


4. The Blair Witch Project (1999)


Image Credit: Haxan Films

Some people might not find the thriller genre to their liking, but even they can admit that ‘The Blair Witch Project' is a one of a kind creation. All scenes look so true to reality that it is all you need to project the crippling sensation into your own personal world.

Three film students lost their way in their mission to reveal the truth about the Blair Witch legend by making a documentary. However, they mysteriously disappear without a trace in the woods. One year later, their footage is discovered which ends up being the actual movie "The Blair Witch Project." This plot line makes room for the collision between movie making and faux documentary in a witty way. You can't get comfortable with this movie. Once the footage starts unwinding, you receive a first-row experience, and you actually feel that you are in the shoes of the terrified main characters.

5. Apocalypse Now (1979)


Image Credit: Zoetrope Studios

A good movie offers its audience the chance to explore a world unseen before. A glorious movie will throw the viewers right in the middle of an unthinkable situation. "Apocalypse Now" offers a raw experience on the bloody fields of war.

Francis Coppola directed the film in the middle of the Vietnam War, in the middle of the annual monsoon season. The film seems to obey only the law of chaos, and no other rules whatsoever. Some enthusiastic crew members even brought in real dead bodies to highlight the desolated and meaningless world of war. Later on, the authorities found out that the bodies didn't pertain to any medical school, but they were illegally dug out by the crew. The workers got arrested and their passports confiscated.

There is no reason to try to make any sense out of it. Coppola admits that he literally went insane for his "Apocalypse Now", being overwhelmed by passion. There is no sign of moral rules to interfere with the raw horror of this war scene.

So, these are the five movies that will change your perception of movie making. Each one of these has stirred many controversial opinions. It is up to you to catch the signs of genius in them while enjoying the show.

Author bio: Erik Winther has a degree in Video Production. One of his biggest dreams is to inspire kids to love cinematography and acting. He hopes of getting his big break as soon as possible, but till then he enjoys reviewing movies for netflixguides.com.

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