Birdman and the Secret of 'Continuous' Takes

By , posted 23 October 2015

The Film Theorists take a look at how Alejandro González Iñárritu's Oscar-winner Birdman achieves the feel of being shot in one continuous take (when it wasn't).



If you're interested in other truly long take films, check out the opening shot of Orson Welles' 1958 thriller, Touch of Evil or Alexander Sokurov's 2002 film, Russian Ark which is the real deal: shot in a single 96 minute Steadicam take.

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