Birdman and the Secret of 'Continuous' Takes

By , posted 23 October 2015

The Film Theorists take a look at how Alejandro González Iñárritu's Oscar-winner Birdman achieves the feel of being shot in one continuous take (when it wasn't).



If you're interested in other truly long take films, check out the opening shot of Orson Welles' 1958 thriller, Touch of Evil or Alexander Sokurov's 2002 film, Russian Ark which is the real deal: shot in a single 96 minute Steadicam take.

Reader Comments

More Posts

Clint Eastwood Gives the Cinema Masterclass at the 2017 Cannes Film Festival

The Master Class is an annual festival fixture in which a respected film practitioner is invited to talk about their approach and their body of work. Watch Clint Eastwood give the 2017 edition.

22-May-2017  • 

How to Film Safely at Height

Leila Jones looks at the regulations and best practice approaches to keeping your crew (and yourself) safe when filming at heights.

16-May-2017  •  Leila Jones

Behind the Scenes With the New RED Weapon 8K Camera on Guardians of the Galaxy Vol.2

Go behind the scenes with Guardians' Director James Gunn and Director of Photography Henry Braham, BSC as they discuss their vision for the movie and the experience they wanted to give viewers.

8-May-2017  •  Benjamin Craig

The Economist Thinks We've Reached 'Peak Indie'

Anyone working in the indie scene over the past few years will have noted the paradox that now exists between the exponential increase in the availability of new distribution platforms and the ever-increasing difficulty for indie films to recoup their budgets.

3-Mar-2017  •  Benjamin Craig

Pixar in a Box - Free 9 Part Course in Storytelling

Khan Academy has teamed up with the master storysmiths at Pixar to provide a video course in the art of storytelling. And if that wasn't cool enough, the whole course is available for free.

16-Feb-2017  •  Benjamin Craig